HONEY BEES

  • KEYSTONE SPECIES

  • IRREPLACEABLE

  • THREATENED WITH EXTINCTION

POLLINATOR GARDEN GUIDLINES

TIPS FOR SUPPORTING POLLINATORS

Whether planning or planting for a Pollinator Garden, keep the following factors in mind to ensure better chances of success.

  • Use a wide variety of native plants that bloom from early spring into late fall. These are most beneficial to pollinators because native plants and insects have evolved together, developing specific relationships over time critical to breeding success. 

  • Include native larval host plants in your landscape. Many pollinators are very specific about which plants they lay their eggs on. 

  • Eliminate pesticide use. Pesticides directly harm or kill insects, even days after application and can adversely affect birds and other animals that eat insects contaminated by pesticides. 

  • Purchase plants from nurseries that are not sprayed with neonicotinoids. Read labels in plants closely as the language can be deceiving. 

  • Establish a native bee house. You can be specific about the type of bees you want to attract. 

  • Leave sandy or bare earth patches in your yard.Many native bees nest in holes the excavate in the soil. 

  • Leave meadows and grasses un-mowed. Seasonal resources throughout the growing season in meadows and grasses provide food and nesting resources for pollinators, including important host plants for caterpillars. 

  • Do not remove your fall leaves. Many pollinators lay their eggs in leaf litter. 

  • Support organic farmers. They are protecting pollinators with their land management practices. 

  • Include structural diversity. Plants of varying heights, like small trees and shrubs, tall grasses, flowers, rock pilessnags, or logs, will attract a greater diversity of pollinators. 

  • Plant in bunches. A single native plant is nice, but a grouping of plants can provide so much more to pollinators. Include native bunch grasses, flowering shrubs, and perennial herbs and wildflowers to optimize nectar and pollen availability.